Sales Taxes for Ecommerce – Everything You Need To Know

Sales tax is an important revenue stream for the government. With how taxes are structured in America, individual taxes like sales tax make up the largest part of tax revenue for the country. So, governments want to ensure they receive the correct amount of taxes each year.

E-commerce Sales Taxes

It’s no longer the case that calculating and paying sales taxes for eCommerce businesses are an easy deal. In fact, with changes over the last few years, sales tax in eCommerce went from easy to complicated – quickly! That’s why we created this exhaustive guide – everything that E-commerce Merchants need to know about Sales Taxes in the United States. We will dive into various topics, such as:

  • What sales taxes are, and how they vary among the different states
  • How to determine if your company has a sales tax obligation in the various states, including explanations of different “nexus” tests that states use, such as physical and economic nexus
  • Marketplace rules (think Amazon and eBay) for dealing with sales on their platforms
  • What products are exempt from sales taxes
  • How drop shippers, retail arbitrage companies, and tax exempt companies handle sales taxes
  • How sales tax holidays and returns are handled
  • How to file and the penalties involved for non-compliance
  • The pros and cons of self-managed sales tax compliance versus using a software
  • Reviews of some of the top software programs for sales taxes
  • And a handy state-by-state listing of all of pertinent sales tax information you need to know!

Let’s dive in and discuss what you need to know about collecting and remitting sales tax as an eCommerce business owner.

What Is a Sales Tax?

Sales tax is a tax placed on specific items or goods when they are sold. Most states and Washington D.C. charge sales tax on various goods. Sales tax in the USA is a consumption tax on the sale of goods and services – it is only levied on the final transaction with the customer – no one else along the supply chain has any charging or reporting requirements.

The tax is imposed at a state level, so there is no federal law which governs the tax for the USA as a whole. The first state to implement a sales tax was West Virginia in 1921 and since then, it has been adopted by 46 states (and is used in Washington DC).

Although the tax is charged by the state and local authorities, it is administered by the seller who is responsible for charging it. A merchant must charge sales tax if it has a ‘Nexus’ in the state, which is the USA’s fancy way of saying “a legal obligation to register and collect sales tax”.Sales tax is collected and remitted by the SELLER of the item. Sellers have to not only collect the sales tax but also register as a collector of sales tax and provide the correct amount of sales tax to the government based on the amount and type of goods sold during the tax collection period.

As a state-level tax, sales tax differs between states. Depending on the jurisdiction, some counties and cities in the United States also charge their own separate sales tax.

Why Do Sales Taxes Exist?

Sales taxes are implemented in areas looking to maintain or improve public services. Things like roads, schools, and emergency services receive funding based partly on the sales tax percentage in the area they operate in. The more sale tax collected, the more funding these services potentially receive.

However, excessive sales taxes can cause economic slowdowns. As the price of items increases, more folks opt out of purchasing that category of items. Thus, states and counties have to balance their service funding levels with consumer attitudes in their areas.

Which States Don’t Have a Sales Tax?

Overall, 45 states charge some amount of sales tax, as well as Washington D.C. Some counties and cities within these states have a sales tax for that area, but these are rare across the country. So almost all states in the US charge sales taxes. However, there are a few that don’t.

The five states that don’t charge any sales tax are:

  • Alaska
  • Delaware
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • Oregon

An easy way to remember these states is with the acronym NOMAD. Each letter represents the first letter of the state that doesn’t charge sales tax (New Hampshire, Oregon, Montana, Alaska, and Delaware).

Do You Have To Charge Sales Tax for eCommerce?

Sales taxes for eCommerce businesses must be collected for sales in every state where they have an ECONOMIC NEXUS. This arrangement gets into strange legal definitions and precedence, so let’s clarify the details.

What Is a Nexus?

Nexus comes from the Latin word “to bind” or “to tie.” In sales tax law, it refers to a state where a seller should collect sales tax based on one or more factors.

Nexus means ‘connection’, and it is the legal test that states must use to implement tax laws. Every state has its own sales tax requirements and each can prescribe its own definition of sales tax nexus that compels a business to comply with their laws.

Most of these factors come down to business operations that would establish a sales tax nexus according to the state’s law.  Those factors are:

  • A physical location in the state, such as an office, warehouse, or manufacturing site for taxable goods (even an outsourced fulfillment company is considered a nexus)
  • Residence of a worker in a state that operates under your business
  • The storage of inventory for your business in a state
  • Sales significant enough to trigger an economic nexus under state law, generally at $100,000 worth of sales or 200 individual points of sale
  • Affiliates selling or marketing your goods in a particular state
  • The presence of a drop shipping relationship in the state
  • The sale of products at a trade show or other mass gathering in the state

Physical Versus Economic Nexus

There are two types of nexus in terms of sales taxes – either physical nexus or economic nexus. A physical nexus is some sort of physical location or employees. Don’t forget though – even using a 3rd Party Warehouse is considered a physical nexus! Economic nexus is when a company makes enough dollar sales or has a certain number of sales transactions. In many states, that amounts to either $100,000 of sales in a year or 200 transactions.

Your economic nexus can change depending on the state. While most use the abovementioned figures, many states have thresholds below or above these values. Knowing the economic nexus threshold for your state is important for remitting the correct amount of taxes.

Historically, states were only allowed to use physical tests to determine nexus. For example, having an office or warehouse storage, employees or even contractors in a state can create what is called Physical Nexus. However, a landmark ruling by the US Supreme Court (South Dakota v. Wayfair, 2018) eliminated the physical presence rule as the standard for creating nexus in a jurisdiction and gave states the right to implement Economic Nexus rules. Instead of focusing on whether the business has a physical presence, states can look at their business activity. The number of transactions or amount of revenue a seller has in a state is now the determining factor for states to compel compliance.

South Dakota v. Wayfair

This Supreme Court ruling came down in 2018 after the state of South Dakota sued an online retailer for sales tax despite the retailer not having any physical presence in North Dakota. Before this ruling, states lost billions of dollars each year in uncollected sales tax due to retailers not being required to collect and remit sales tax to state governments.

The ruling overturned decisions made in previous Supreme Court cases, including Quill v. North Dakota and National Bellas Hess v. Illinois.

Quill v. North Dakota involved the state suing Quill Corp, a retailer, for sales tax. However, the corporation proved that it had no economic nexus to the state at that time due to the lack of physical presence in the state, resulting in the decision favoring Quill.

National Bellas Hess helped form the foundation of the Quill v. Dakota case in 1967, though with a mail order catalog business instead of eCommerce. Again, the court ruled that the mail-order company had no reason to collect sales tax for Illinois without a physical presence in the state.

With the decision laid out by South Dakota v. Wayfair and the adoption of the standards found in that case, there are roughly 12,000 jurisdictions of sales tax eCommerce businesses have to worry about!

If you sell via your own website, sales tax is your responsibility. All 47 US states that have sales tax oblige the seller to register and charge sales tax on their transactions if the sales are made on a web shop. Regardless of whether you deliver your products from outside the US or from fulfilment centre(s) in the states, it is your responsibility to determine whether you have created a Nexus in the state where your website has delivered to and register accordingly. Even if the majority of your sales are done on a marketplace, if you are “omni-channel” and also sell to the US from your own site, the obligations will still apply.

Marketplaces With Built-In Sales Tax

A seller’s nexus obligations will depend on how they sell their product – do they use their own website or a marketplace? A marketplace refers to any communal website that caters for numerous retailers and shoppers. The most popular markets in the U. S. are Amazon, Walmart, eBay, and Etsy. The general rule is this: in most states, sales tax is the marketplace’s problem. Several marketplaces have tools built into their services to collect sales tax to help eCommerce businesses collect and remit sales tax. Here are some of the larger names and how they do it:

Amazon – Amazon uses the location of the buyer and seller when determining the sales tax of an order from a customer. For United States orders, Amazon lists that they may collect sales tax for 48 states and regions in and around the US, including Alaska, which doesn’t normally charge sales tax.

Every order has an estimated sales tax amount listed before the order is placed for the customer to review.

Etsy – Much like Amazon, Etsy automatically collects sales tax on orders from over 30 states and territories in the United States.

Depending on how the customer orders your items, Etsy either collects the sales tax for the seller or charges the seller for sales tax as part of their monthly Etsy bill. Regardless of when the sales tax is collected, Etsy helps independent crafters collect sales tax.

Walmart – While Walmart can collect sales tax for their partners, it isn’t automatic without setting up some information on your partner page. Your business will need to enter the appropriate tax IDs to the states you deal in for Walmart to start this process. Once you enter all the info, Walmart will collect and remit sales taxes automatically for their partners during each point of sale.

eBay – eBay automatically applies sales tax to orders in states where marketplaces are legally obligated to do so. Otherwise, eBay provides tools and guidance for sellers on how to apply sales tax to their goods based on where their customers are or where to send sales tax remittances after a sale.

What Products Are Subject to Sales Tax?

Because sales taxes occur at the state level, there isn’t a unified code of what is and is not subjected to sales tax. While a few categories are not taxed, the list of things that are taxed varies widely.

For example, most states do not charge sales tax on food in places like groceries stores or restaurants. However, a handful of states, like Arkansas, West Virginia, and Tennessee, do charge sales tax for food.

Almost all states do not charge sales tax on prescription drugs, though some states, like Illinois, do charge a small sales tax on non-prescription drugs.

However, one thing states do share when it comes to sales tax is that they will consider purchases for both goods and services as possible sales tax targets. As our economy focuses more on services over good production, states realize that taxing services will increase their revenue.

The easiest way to find out what is or is not taxable in your state is to review the tax guidelines on the state’s website. The FTA has a compilation of tax and revenue law pages for states that makes for a great resource during this research.

Dropshippers and Sales Tax

Dropshipping refers to a business with orders for goods handled by third parties. The dropshipping business collects orders for manufacturers, and then the manufacturers make, pack, and ship the order to the customer. Dropshipping works well with on-demand style manufacturing since manufacturers don’t have to make goods until the orders come in.

Dropshipping companies have to follow the same rules that other eCommerce businesses do with sales tax. However, dropshipping companies also have to worry about where their partnered businesses are, as that can also create a sales tax nexus for the dropshipping business.

A resale certificate can help offset some of the headaches around registering for sale tax, though. These certificates allow you to register with a state to obtain items for resale without paying sales tax. Some states accept other states’ resale certificates, allowing you to reduce the number of certificates you have to obtain to do business across state lines.

Not all states accept out-of-state certifications, though. If you work with any of these states, you’ll have to get the state-specific resale cert:

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.

Retail Arbitrage and Sales Tax

Retail arbitrage refers to the practice of buying an item for a low price and reselling it for a higher price on a different platform or marketplace. Retail arbitrage generally relies on finding good prices on items in a physical location and reselling them for a higher price online.

Much like with other eCommerce businesses, retail arbitrage businesses have to collect sales tax after reselling their goods to a buyer who seeks to own or use the item rather than resell it. The amount of sales tax depends on where the customer is, just like normal.

Most of the platforms folks use for arbitrage today include sales tax as part of the point of sale. Amazon, eBay, and similar commerce giants have built-in tools for calculating estimated sales tax or tools to help sellers factor in sales tax for them to collect later.

What are Sales Tax Holidays?

A sales tax holiday is a specified period where products that would normally be taxable become exempt from sales tax. Almost 20 states offer sales tax holidays each year (the exact number of states depends on whether some states implement new holidays or allow existing holidays to expire).

Sales tax holidays that apply to several products do exist, but the main idea of a tax-free period in most states is usually for one of the following reasons:

  • School subsidies at the start of a new term (specified clothing and school supplies)
  • Disaster preparedness (specified supplies to help taxpayers weather floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes)
  • Carbon neutral / “Green” initiatives (specified energy-efficient products)Health, hygiene and welfare
    Second Amendment (specified ammunition, guns, and hunting supplies)

The details of each tax holiday vary by state. It doesn’t really matter what products qualify for the temporary exemption, consumers always love tax-free periods since the goods they buy become cheaper. Most businesses don’t hate the holidays since they boost demand as consumers shop more, so it usually helps their sales.

However, sales tax holidays can be a pain in the backside for businesses because they have to update their systems to ensure tax isn’t charged on those sales during the tax-free period. It gets even more painful, but in some states local governments aren’t required to participate in sales tax holidays, so retailers might eb forced to exempt the state portion of the tax, but apply some local sales taxes.

Some tax exemptions during the holiday are based on value, so a product than is less than $50 might be exempt, but anything more and the tax still applies. Finally, sellers must also understand how the tax holiday impacts the taxability of shipping and other ancillary charges.

How To Handle Sales Tax With Refunds

Not every purchase customers make will end after the sale. For any number of reasons, a customer may wish to return an item or receive a refund on their purchase after poor service, products not being the right size or products that generally don’t meet the customers’ expectation. In these cases, eCommerce businesses need to know what to do about the sales tax they collected.

In general, you should refund sales tax along with the purchase amount when fulfilling a refund. This practice ensures that you do not collect excess sales tax and that the original customer receives their full refund.

Businesses that don’t refund sales tax may find themselves receiving an audit or other legal recourse if not returning sales taxes. Many states have resources for those that believe they paid too much on sales tax, allowing them to get the state involved with refunding the money.

Penalties When You Don’t Comply With Sales Tax

States have the right to legally demand all historic taxes you should have paid to them, and they can add ruinous penalties on top of that. There are severe consequences for not paying sales tax to the government when tax collection comes around.

Generally, the first step in this process is that the business receives a letter or other form of contact indicating that the business owes sales tax. This correspondence requires that the business submits accurate sales tax information and payment within a listed time frame, or else the government charges a large penalty for tax evasion.

The amount due in penalties depends on the state. On average, states charge an extra 30% of the sale tax owed to the government as a penalty. Thus, being on the hook for $5,000 of sales tax means you would owe an extra $1,500 to the government.

Each US state has the right to impose its own penalties. In most cases this will be levied as a percentage of the tax you owe, with interest applied as well. For example,, New York will penalise you 10% of the tax due for the first month plus 1% for each additional month or part of a month. California will also whack you with 10% of the tax payable, but they also reserve the right to charge a “Collection Cost Recovery Fee”, which is at their discretion.

These penalties have to come out of your pocket. You generally cannot repay over a period or delay outside of the provided window. This is especially true in cases suspected of tax fraud or cover-ups.

In addition to the financial penalties that can be payable, there are other ways non-compliance can impact your business negatively, including:

  • Your website could be shut down by the state
  • You will fail a due diligence analysis if you ever sell or list your business
  • It will create irreparable reputational damage
  • Your product could be banned in the USA

Failure to comply with sales tax law can result in higher financial penalties or jail time depending on the state and the amount of money owed by the business.

How To Comply With Sales Tax Laws

To ensure that you collect and remit the correct amount of sales tax each year, we have some guidelines you can follow regardless of your economic nexus:

Register for a Sales Tax Permit

A sales tax permit makes it clear to the state that you are an online seller and that you want to work with the government to submit accurate sales tax info. Registering for a permit also makes it easier to set up sales tax calculations on many online marketplaces since you will need your tax ID for most of the automation. It’s important to note that you must register is all states where you have a physical or economic nexus. Generally, registration involves completing a detailed registration and providing supporting documentation.

Set up Sales Tax Collection in Your Shop

For businesses using a large, established online marketplace, you will see that most or all instances of sales tax happen automatically for you. These companies collect and remit sales tax for you, allowing you to focus on your business and sales.

Otherwise, you might need to look into setting up a sales tax calculator and tracking sales for your business using tax management software. Many online shopping carts either offer a form of sales tax compliance or integrate with sales tax software.

Report and File Collected Sales Tax

Once you have your tax information in order, you will want to send that info to your state government to have their tax and revenue department review the data. Along with this data, you may be asked to send any sales tax not yet submitted from your automatic collection services or online market platforms.

Pros and Cons of Doing Sales Tax Yourself

Much of your eCommerce business model will decide how you have to handle sales tax. Businesses using large platforms will likely find that most or all of their sales tax calculations and tracking happen automatically. However, those running a shop for their website or small business might not be so lucky.

Most businesses hire or contract financial services or purchase tax management software to handle their sales tax. You can do these tasks in-house, which does come with some upsides:

  • You spend less money overall obtaining the tools, rather than the staff or contractor
  • People in your business know what your business is like and what its sales figures are, leading to less confusion
  • Financial data stays within the company, helping to prevent leaks of sensitive data

Still, there are some downsides to doing your sales tax in-house:

  • A lack of expertise can increase the chance of errors due to missing or neglected information
  • Avoiding software tools allows for mistakes or missed deadlines
  • You have to spend extra time on taxes that could be handled by another party or automated software
  • Sales taxes can get complicated – for example, a single transaction in one state may require 3-4 different taxes to be charged and remitted
  • Each state has different filing portals, methods and requirements, and keeping up with all of them is cumbersome
  • Tax offices may require ongoing questions about your returns, adding to administration and compliance

Overall, the best practice for most businesses is to obtain and use tax management software in-house. This practice lets a business keep all of its tax information private and performed by your own in-house staff while still getting the benefits of a semi-automated tool to speed up tax reporting.

Things to Look for in a Good Sales Tax Software

US sales tax is complex for many reasons: there are 47 different states, each with their own rules, There are over 13,000 local taxing jurisdictions, each with their own rates, and there are an infinite number of potential products to sell, each of which will have unique taxability.

The first thing you might consider when assessing sales tax software is “Point of sale” tax calculation. Most eCommerce platforms, accounting packages or payment solutions will have the functionality to be configured for sales tax – but they need to be set up correctly. They may not be 100% accurate when it comes to tax rates, these are sufficient to use if configured accurately. (It will need to be based on your circumstances – specifically where you are registered for tax and your product catalogue).

If your platform doesn’t have an option to calculate sales tax calculation, you may want to consider software that can integrate with your website and take care of this.

Charging sales tax at checkout is only one very small part of a big Sales Tax puzzle. You need to know where you have nexus – and this is an ongoing requirement since you will have to monitor your sales activity in all states so you know if you have to start charging sales tax in new states.

Therefore, software that automatically monitors your nexus exposure in all states is preferable.

Once registered, you have an ongoing compliance obligation: you have to file a sales tax return with each state where you report the amount of tax you charged and remit the funds to the tax office. These returns are filed monthly or quarterly in most states.

Calculating and collecting sales tax is almost impossible without intelligent, rules-based automation. The software should be able to automatically work out the latest rate to apply to a transaction, cross-checking thousands of state rules and regulations to improve accuracy. The importance of having an automated reporting system is fundamental.

Once the correct rate has been applied to every transaction, you still have the not-so-small job of creating and filing the tax returns to each state. Populating tax returns can be simple in some states, but in others they have multiple localities, each of whom want your sales broken down to a very granular level.

Your sales tax platform needs to build your returns and then file them to the appropriate state tax office. All a seller should need to do is get their sales data into the software, tell it what products they sell and where they are registered, and the system should be able to do all the heavy lifting.

Finally, filing the tax return can be difficult. While many states still require a manual population of the return, some states will accept an upload, and a few states have an electronic filing option. It can be a huge benefit if your sales tax software has the functionality to output the tax returns in a format that is eligible for upload, and even better if it can do the electronic filing automatically in the states that allow it.

Companies That Perform Sales Tax Compliance for You

There is plenty of tax management software out there that can help you with sales taxes for eCommerce. Here are some of the more well-known software out there and how they can help:

Yonda Tax

Yonda Tax is a tax consulting and service product that helps eCommerce websites set up their websites to collect sales tax. In addition to consultation, they also offer tools that help with sales tax calculation and tax submission each year.

Yonda’s sales tax solution combines simple and elegant technology, with knowledgeable and experienced support at every step.

Yonda’s software integrates with all the major eCommerce platforms, to ensure your data can be securely imported for processing at month-end. The intuitive, user-friendly interface makes the process easy and completely transparent – and the sophisticated rules-engine ensures your returns will be 100% accurate and filed automatically.

The software also monitors your sales in all US states, ensuring you stay on top of the nexus thresholds and your additional sales tax obligations. Complementing all of this is your Yonda Wingman – your dedicated account manager who will understand your business and specific circumstances, and be available to answer any questions you might have or to offer practical advice if anything changes.

Between their new entry into the tax space and the lack of pricing on their website, the only way to know how much Yondatax costs is to schedule a consultation.

QuickBooks

For freelancers and small operations, QuickBooks has tools to help figure out sales tax. Invoice and sales tracking, automatic tax deductions, and receipt capture help eCommerce businesses know what their financials are for each tax season.

QuickBooks has four tiers of subscriptions: Simple, Essential, Plus, and Advanced. These range in price from $30 to $200 per month, but new customers get 50% off the first three months.

TaxJar

TaxJar offers tools for tracking your sales tax burden during each tax season and the progress you make to establishing nexus status across the United States. The platform integrates with many popular eCommerce platforms, including Amazon and Shopify.

Their Starter and Professional level subscriptions are $19 per month and $99 per month, respectively. The Professional level gets you more integrations and active users for your account at a time.

Avalara

Avalara is a scaling tax management platform meant to help your business determine its tax burden and risk of tax audit no matter what size the business is. In addition to working for the United States, Avalara also keeps up-to-date on eCommerce sales tax laws for the United Kingdom and the European Union.

Avalara doesn’t have a set price for its service. Instead, they charge a fee based on transaction volume and the number of accounts you need.

Quaderno

Quaderno is an eCommerce tax platform for entrepreneurs. While Quaderno doesn’t handle the transaction volumes others on this list can, it offers automated collection and billing for taxes based on your customer’s location.

Their subscription tiers range from $29 to $140 per month, depending on the number of transactions you expect each month.

Sovos

In addition to automatic sales tax calculations, Sovos helps with shipping and distribution compliance to help businesses keep their inventory flowing. Their platform integrates well with a range of fields, not just eCommerce.

However, Sovos doesn’t offer pricing information without a consultation.

Vertex, Inc.

Vertex, Inc. is a tax management system that does more than calculate sale tax. Payroll tax, service taxes, and other taxes associated with operational costs all come packaged with Vertex’s services.

Like others on this list, Vertex doesn’t list a set price for their platform. Potential customers should consult with the company first when settling on a price.

TaxCloud

TaxCloud is one of the cheapest sales tax platforms on the market. They focus on sales tax for the United States, offering automatic tools for calculating and collecting sales tax across the most popular eCommerce platforms.

Their cheapest subscriptions cost $10 per month. But, more advanced options can go for much more than this, depending on transaction volume and customer locations.

Summary of Key E-commerce Sales Tax Information by State

State: Alabama
Code: AL
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 0%–7%
Local range: 0%-7%
Total range: 4%-11%
Does an Alabama warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $250,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Alabama law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, purchases made with food stamps, and prescription drugs.

State: Alaska
Code: AK
Has state sales tax? No
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 0%
Local range: 0%–7.5%
Total range: 0%–7.5%
Does an Alaska warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? N/A
Electronically downloadable products taxable? N/A
Tax Exempt Goods: No statewide sales tax exemptions, cities and boroughs are authorized to grant local exemptions

State: Arizona
Code: AZ
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5.60%
Local range: 0%–5.6%
Total range: 5.6%–11.2%
Does an Arizona warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from TPT under Arizona law. Examples include food sold by qualified retailers, prescription drugs, and some medical devices.

State: Arkansas
Code: AR
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.50%
Local range: 0%–5%
Total range: 6.5%–11.5%
Does an Arkansas warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Arkansas law. Examples include prescription drugs, purchases made with food stamps, and some farming equipment.

State: California
Code: CA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.00%
Local range: 0.15%–3%
Total range: 7.25%–10.25%
Does a California warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $500,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under California law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies.

State: Colorado
Code: CO
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 2.90%
Local range: 0%–8.3%
Total range: 2.9%–11.2%
Does a Colorado warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Non-taxable but taxable at a local level
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Non-taxable but taxable at a local level
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Colorado law. Examples include beetle wood products, food for home consumption, and farm equipment. In Colorado, state-level exemptions may differ from local-level exemptions.

State: Connecticut
Code: CT
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 6.35%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 6.35%
Does a Connecticut warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales and Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Connecticut law. Examples include bicycle helmets, most non-prepared food items, medicines, and some medical devices and supplies.

State: Delaware
Code: DE
Has state sales tax? No
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 0%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 0%–0%
Does a Delaware warehouse create physical nexus? No
Economic nexus test: N/A
Economic nexus sales threshold: N/A
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? N/A
Electronically downloadable products taxable? N/A
Tax Exempt Goods: N/A

State: Florida
Code: FL
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–2%
Total range: 6%–8%
Does a Florida warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? NoG
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Florida law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies.

State: Georgia
Code: GA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4%
Local range: 0%–5%
Total range: 4%–9%
Does a Georgia warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable produHcts taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Georgia law. Examples include some prescription drugs, medical supplies, and manufacturing equipment. Non-prepared food items are exempt from state sales tax, but are subject to local sales taxes.

State: Hawaii
Code: HI
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4%
Local range: 0%–0.5%
Total range: 4%–4.5%
Does a Hawaii warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from GET under Hawaii law. Examples include purchases made with food stamps, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Idaho
Code: ID
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–3%
Total range: 6%–9%
Does an Idaho warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Idaho law. Examples include computer software, prescription medications, and qualified purchases made with food stamps.

State: Illinois
Code: IL
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.25%
Local range: 0%–4.75%
Total range: 6.25%–11%
Does an Illinois warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Non-taxable but taxable at a local level
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Illinois law. Examples include fuel for international flights, gold bullion issued by qualifying governments, and newspapers and magazines.

State: Indiana
Code: IN
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 7%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 7%
Does an Indiana warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Indiana law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Iowa
Code: IA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–2%
Total range: 6%–8%
Does an Iowa warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Y (B2B)
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Iowa law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Kansas
Code: KS
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.50%
Local range: 0%–4.1%
Total range: 6.5%–10.6%
Does a Kansas warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Kansas law. Examples include farm machinery and equipment, prescription drugs, and some medical devices.

State: Kentucky
Code: KY
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 6%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 6%
Does a Kentucky warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Kentucky law. Examples include groceries, prescription drugs, and some manufacturing equipment.

State: Louisiana
Code: LA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.45%
Local range: 0%–7%
Total range: 4.45%–11.45%
Does a Louisiana warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Louisiana law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and utilities

State: Maine
Code: ME
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 5.50%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 5.50%
Does a Maine warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No Guidance
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Maine law. Examples include some groceries, prescription drugs, and medical devices.

State: Maryland
Code: MN
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 6%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 6%
Does a Maryland warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Maryland law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription and over-the-counter medicines, and medical supplies.

State: Massachusetts
Code: MA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 5.60%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 6.25%
Does a Massachusetts warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Massachusetts law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, some clothing, and home heating fuels.

State: Michigan
Code: MI
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 6%
Total range: N/A
Does a Michigan warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Michigan law. Examples include prescription medications, groceries, newspapers, medical devices, and some agricultural and industrial machinery.

State: Minnesota
Code: MN
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.88%
Local range: 0%–1.5%
Total range: 6.875%–8.375%
Does a Minnesota warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Minnesota law. Examples include most grocery items, feminine hygiene products, and medical supplies.

State: Mississippi
Code: MS
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 7%
Local range: 0%–1%
Total range: 7%–8%
Does a Mississippi warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $250,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Mississippi law. Examples include most non-prepared food items purchased with food stamps, prescription drugs, and some medical supplies.

State: Missouri
Code: MO
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.23%
Local range: 0%–5.875%
Total range: 4.225%–10.1%
Does a Missouri warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: N/A
Economic nexus sales threshold: N/A
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Missouri law. Examples include certain fuels, some medications, and medical equipment.

State: Montana
Code: MY
Has state sales tax? No
Has local tax? No
State base rate: N/A
Local range: N/A
Total range: N/A
Does a Montana warehouse create physical nexus? No
Economic nexus test: N/A
Economic nexus sales threshold: N/A
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: N/A

State: Nebraska
Code: NE
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5.50%
Local range: 0%–2%
Total range: 5.5%–7.5%
Does a Nebraska warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Nebraska law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription medication, and medical equipment.

State: Nevada
Code: NV
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.60%
Local range: 0%–3.665%
Total range: 4.6%–8.265%
Does a Nevada warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Nevada law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, newspapers, and some farming equipment.

State: New Hampshire
Code: NH
Has state sales tax? No
Has local tax? No
State base rate: N/A
Local range: N/A
Total range: N/A
Does a New Hampshire warehouse create physical nexus? No
Economic nexus test: N/A
Economic nexus sales threshold: N/A
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: N/A

State: New Jersey
Code: NJ
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 6.63%
Local range: N/A
Total range: N/A
Does a New Jersey warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under New Jersey law. Examples include clothing and footwear, most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies. New Jersey also offers a partial exemption for certain products, such as boats.

State: New Mexico
Code: NM
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5.13%
Local range: 0%–3.9375%
Total range: 5.125%–9.0625%
Does a New Mexico warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some sales are deductible or exempt from gross receipts tax under New Mexico law. Examples include durable medical equipment, some medical services, and purchases made with food stamps.

State: New York
Code: NY
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4%
Local range: 0%–4.875%
Total range: 4%–8.875%
Does a New York warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales and Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $500,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 100
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under New York law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies.

State: North Carolina
Code: NC
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.75%
Local range: 0%–2.75%
Total range: 4.75%–7.5%
Does a North Carolina warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under North Carolina law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies.

State: North Dakota
Code: ND
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5%
Local range: 0%–3.5%
Total range: 5%–8.5%
Does a North Dakota warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No Guidance
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under North Dakota law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, prescription medications, and medical supplies.

State: Ohio
Code: OH
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5.75%
Local range: 0%–2.25%
Total range: 5.75%–8%
Does an Ohio warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Ohio law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, items purchased with food stamps, and prescription drugs.

State: Oklahoma
Code: OK
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.50%
Local range: 0%–7%
Total range: 4.5%–11.5%
Does an Oklahoma warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Oklahoma law. Examples include purchases made with food stamps, prescription drugs, and some manufacturing equipment.

State: Oregon
Code: OR
Has state sales tax? No
Has local tax? No
State base rate: N/A
Local range: N/A
Total range: N/A
Does an Oregon warehouse create physical nexus? No
Economic nexus test: N/A
Economic nexus sales threshold: N/A
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: N/A

State: Pennsylvania
Code: Yes
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? 6%
State base rate: 6.0%–8.0%
Local range: 0%–2.0%
Total range: 6.0%–8.0%
Does a Pennsylvania warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Pennsylvania law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, items purchased with food stamps, prescription drugs, and most (but not all) wearing apparel.

State: Rhode Island
Code: RI
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? No
State base rate: 7%
Local range: N/A
Total range: 7%
Does a Rhode Island warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Rhode Island law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription medications, and some clothing.

State: South Carolina
Code: SC
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–3%
Total range: 6%–9%
Does a South Carolina warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under South Carolina law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: South Dakota
Code: SD
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.50%
Local range: 0%–2%
Total range: 4.5%–6.5%
Does a South Dakota warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under South Dakota law. Examples include gasoline, purchases made with food stamps, and prescription drugs.

State: Tennessee
Code: TN
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 7%
Local range: 0%–3%
Total range: 7%–10%
Does a Tennessee warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Tennessee law. Examples include some industrial machinery, agricultural equipment, fuel, and medical supplies.

State: Texas
Code: TX
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.25%
Local range: 0.125%–2%
Total range: 6.375%–8.25%
Does a Texas warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $500,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Texas law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, food stamps, and medical supplies.

State: Utah
Code: UT
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.70%
Local range: 0%–4%
Total range: 4.7%–8.7%
Does a Utah warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Utah law. Examples include some agriculture supplies, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Vermont
Code: VT
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–1%
Total range: 6%–7%
Does a Vermont warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Vermont law. Examples include some agriculture supplies, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Virginia
Code: VA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4.30%
Local range: 0%–2.7%
Total range: 4.3%–7%
Does a Virginia warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? No
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Virginia law. Examples include prescription drugs and purchases made with some government credit cards.

State: Washington
Code: WA
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6.50%
Local range: 0%–3.9%
Total range: 6.5%–10.4%
Does a Washington warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? Yes
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Washington law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and some machinery and equipment.

State: West Virginia
Code: WV
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 6%
Local range: 0%–1%
Total range: 6%–7%
Does a West Virginia warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under West Virginia law. Examples include most textbooks, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Wisconsin
Code: WI
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 5%
Local range: 0%–0.6%
Total range: 5%–5.6%
Does a Wisconsin warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: N/A
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Wisconsin law. Examples include most non-prepared food items, prescription drugs, and medical supplies.

State: Wyoming
Code: WY
Has state sales tax? Yes
Has local tax? Yes
State base rate: 4%
Local range: 0%–2%
Total range: 4%–6%
Does a Wyoming warehouse create physical nexus? Yes
Economic nexus test: Sales or Transactions
Economic nexus sales threshold: $100,000
Economic nexus transactions threshold: 200
SAAS taxable? No
Electronically downloadable products taxable? Yes
Tax Exempt Goods: Some goods are exempt from sales tax under Wyoming law. Examples include groceries purchased with food stamps, prescription medications, and most medical supplies.

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